66° Clarksville
West Creek High's Student News Site

The Coyote Caller

The Coyote Caller

The Coyote Caller

Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Scott Hoskins, Journalism Adviser/Photographer • Published May 13, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Scott Hoskins, Journalism Adviser/Photographer • Published May 13, 2024
Photo Gallery: JROTC @Daytona Beach Drill World Championships
Photo Gallery: JROTC @Daytona Beach Drill World Championships
Gisely Argueta, Phototgrapher • Published May 8, 2024
Exam schedule posted
Exam schedule posted
Staff ReportPublished May 8, 2024
Laptop collection day set for Thursday, May 16
Laptop collection day set for Thursday, May 16
Staff ReportPublished May 6, 2024

Everything you need to know about Cinco de Mayo

Everything+you+need+to+know+about+Cinco+de+Mayo

Cinco de Mayo, literally the Fifth of May, is a day that Americans love to celebrate. Mexican restaurants are packed with customers drinking margaritas and enjoying Mexican food. Believe it or not, though, it’s not a major Mexican holiday. And it does NOT celebrate Mexico’s independence from Spain (that’s September 16, when Father Hidalgo called for Mexico’s independence from Spain in September 1810).

But what exactly is Cinco de Mayo, and why do Americans celebrate it?

Cinco de Mayo celebrates the Battle of Puebla in 1861. In the town of Puebla de Los Angeles (not our Los Angeles), General Ignacio Zaragoza defeated French troops. The French lost about 500 soldiers, while the Mexicans lost less than 100. The battle became a symbolic victory for the Mexican government in their war against France. Mexico ultimately emerged victorious in 1867.

Ethnic Mexicans don’t really celebrate the day like Americans. It’s mainly observed in the state of Puebla (the site of the battle). There may be parades and other festive activities, but the United States is really where Cinco de Mayo has taken off. It has become a celebration of Mexican heritage and culture. It wasn’t until the 1960s, though, that “raised awareness of the holiday in the 1960s, in part because they identified with the victory of Indigenous Mexicans (such as Ju├írez) over European invaders during the Battle of Puebla.”1

West Creek Spanish teacher Jasmine Staten-Robinson said, “Mexican Americans are noted to have initiated the celebration of Cinco de Mayo as an opportunity for them to celebrate their Mexican heritage in the country they resided in. This was in the 1960s, while many other minorities also fought for the space to honor their identities and customs in this country.” She also said that Americans have taken it as a marketing tool and revenue source for partying. While this is true, she makes sure to teach her students about this day so that they do not start to believe stereotypes and participate in the misappropriation of another culture.

So now that you know the truth behind Cinco de Mayo, you can show how smart you are by correcting those who don’t know the facts.

  1. https://www.history.com/topics/holidays/cinco-de-mayo