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The Coyote Caller

The Coyote Caller

The Coyote Caller

Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Scott Hoskins, Journalism Adviser/Photographer • Published May 13, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Scott Hoskins, Journalism Adviser/Photographer • Published May 13, 2024
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Exam schedule posted
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Laptop collection day set for Thursday, May 16
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“Staycation” Spot #3: Fort Defiance

photo+courtesy+of+TNvacation.com.
photo courtesy of TNvacation.com.

Did you know that Clarksville played a role in the Civil War? It may not be something you learned in history class, but Clarksville had its own fort, Fort Defiance.

The following information is taken from the Fort Defiance website, operated by the Clarksville Department of Parks and Recreation: https://www.cityofclarksville.com/461/Fort-Defiance-Civil-War-Park-Interpretiv

“Located on a bluff 200 feet above the confluence of the Red and Cumberland Rivers in Clarksville, Tennessee, the Fort Defiance site has been a hub of activity for more than two centuries. Originally inhabited by Native Americans, white settlers began arriving in the late 18th Century. The area became a trading center and settlement. During the Civil War, the hilltop was chosen by Confederate troops as a site to construct a fort to defend the river approach to Clarksville.

In February 1862, the fort was captured by Union forces, renamed, and occupied for the remainder of the war. The site was a magnet for runaway and freed slaves, and many were employed in and around the fort. It then became an enlistment location for the United States Colored Troops. Today, a visitor will find Fort Defiance remarkably well preserved; the outer earthworks, powder magazine and gun platforms are still discernible.

photo courtesy of TNvacation.com

In 1982, Judge and Mrs. Sam Boaz donated the property to the City of Clarksville. In 2008, the City secured a $2.2 million federal grant that was combined with local funding to begin the construction of the Interpretive Center and nearly a mile of walking trails. The more than 1,500-square-foot Interpretive Center features exhibits about the surrounding area and the fort during the Civil War era.”

Admission is free. A gift shop, picnic tables, exhibits and walking trail are part of the amenities. People can take group tours.

Fort Defiance Civil War Park & Interpretive Center is located at 120 Duncan Street (New Providence, up Boot Hill). The park is currently open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and on Sunday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

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