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The Coyote Caller

The Coyote Caller

The Coyote Caller

Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Scott Hoskins, Journalism Adviser/Photographer • Published May 13, 2024
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Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Scott Hoskins, Journalism Adviser/Photographer • Published May 13, 2024
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Photo Gallery: JROTC @Daytona Beach Drill World Championships
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Exam schedule posted
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Teachers were military children, too: Part 2

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Ali Weeks
Mr. King’s father served in the U.S. Army.

Audiovisual production teacher Aaron King was actually born in Clarksville, left, and came back. This is not as odd as it seems. Many military families move back to Clarksville after the soldier completes his/her service. Mr. King’s father retired to Clarksville after finishing his service at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

Ali Weeks sat down with Mr. King to discuss his experiences as a military child.

Ali Weeks: What does it mean to you to be a military child?

Aaron King: “It taught me some amazing communication skills, along with being able to adapt and overcome a lot of obstacles in life.”

AW: How many different places have you lived?

AK: “Only two. My dad was stationed here in Fort Campbell. And I was born here in Clarksville, then when I was going into 4th grade, we moved to North Carolina because he stationed at Fort Bragg.”

AW: How many schools have you attended?

AK: “A lot. Moore Magnet, Saint Bethlehem, and then in North Carolina, I went to Harnett County Elementary School, and then Overhills Middle School. Then Clarksville High School.”

AW: What is the hardest part about a parent being in the military?

AK: “Missing out on a lot of birthdays, sports events that were missed because of deployments and things like that. It was tough, and then when they go on deployments, thinking that maybe they don’t come back, is always hard.”

AW: What are the positives of being a military child?

AK: “You get to meet a lot of new people. It’s almost like being in a little club that you can relate to other people and share experiences.”

AW: What is the biggest negative about being a military child?

AK: “I would say the same thing. Not being able to see your parents, and things like lost time.”

AW: Where was your favorite place you moved to?

AK: “North Carolina.”

AW: Which parent was in the military?

AK: “My father.”

AW: Was it ever hard for you to make friends?

AK: “No, my dad was very outgoing, and I got that trait from him. So I never struggled to talk to anybody or find friends.”

AW: What are some special memories you have with your parent who’s in the military?

AK: “I would say the coolest thing I ever watched was a final official flight my dad had.”

AW: What do you enjoy the most about being a military child?

AK: “I think it would be being part of that community of military families that all can share the same experiences and stories.”

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