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The Coyote Caller

The Coyote Caller

The Coyote Caller

Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Scott Hoskins, Journalism Adviser/Photographer • Published May 13, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Scott Hoskins, Journalism Adviser/Photographer • Published May 13, 2024
Photo Gallery: JROTC @Daytona Beach Drill World Championships
Photo Gallery: JROTC @Daytona Beach Drill World Championships
Gisely Argueta, Phototgrapher • Published May 8, 2024
Exam schedule posted
Exam schedule posted
Staff ReportPublished May 8, 2024
Laptop collection day set for Thursday, May 16
Laptop collection day set for Thursday, May 16
Staff ReportPublished May 6, 2024

Celebrating Vija Celmins

Artist known for her photo-realistic paintings and drawings of natural environments
Celebrating Vija Celmins
https://www.unitedstatesartists.org/fellow/vija-celmins/

In celebration of Women’s History Month, The Coyote Caller is recognizing women from around the world who have made a contribution to society. Today, we recognize Vija Celmins, a world-renowned artist.

Celmins is one of many famous women artists our world has to offer. She is known for so many things, but overall she is famous for photo-realistic paintings and drawings of natural environments and phenomena such as the ocean, spider webs, star fields, and rocks.

Celmins was born in Riga, Latvia, in 1938. Her family moved to Indiana in the United States in 1948. She graduated from the John Herrion School of Art and Design in Indianapolis and earned a master’s of fine arts from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA).

Her earlier work included pop sculptures and monochromatic representational paintings. With all of this knowledge and experience of all the art she has made, she has received the following awards: MacArthur Fellowship, Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts, US & Canada.

Untitled, 1969. Graphite on acrylic ground. Stanford Art Museum ((CC BY-NC 2.0) Rob Corder)
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