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The Coyote Caller

The Coyote Caller

The Coyote Caller

Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Scott Hoskins, Journalism Adviser/Photographer • Published May 13, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Photo Gallery: Soccer vs. Northwest, May 9, 2024
Scott Hoskins, Journalism Adviser/Photographer • Published May 13, 2024
Photo Gallery: JROTC @Daytona Beach Drill World Championships
Photo Gallery: JROTC @Daytona Beach Drill World Championships
Gisely Argueta, Phototgrapher • Published May 8, 2024
Exam schedule posted
Exam schedule posted
Staff ReportPublished May 8, 2024
Laptop collection day set for Thursday, May 16
Laptop collection day set for Thursday, May 16
Staff ReportPublished May 6, 2024

Celebrating Marie Curie

The first woman to win a Nobel Prize
Marie+Curie%2C+First+Woman+to+Win+a+Nobel+Prize
photo courtesy of Welcome Images
Marie Curie, First Woman to Win a Nobel Prize

In celebration of Women’s History Month, The Coyote Caller is recognizing women from around the world who have made a contribution to society. Today, we recognize Marie Curie, the first woman to ever win the Nobel Prize.

Curie was born in Warsaw, Poland on November 7, 1867. Growing up, Cure lost both her sister and her mother within a span of eight years. However, even after going through many losses at a young age, she still received a general education. Falling in love with science, Curie received scientific training with her father and later moved to Paris in 1891 to study physics, chemistry, and math at the University of Paris.  

 She would later meet her husband Pierre Curie. Earning two degrees at the university, Marie and her husband had set up a laboratory where they would build their own equipment and set up their own experiments inside of their basement. Without any precautions, Marie studied radioactivity and also began to discover unusual properties of elements. 

Among her many discoveries, Curie had discovered entirely new elements like radium and polonium, which are used for treating cancer.  Curie also discovered radiation in pitchblende.  It took nearly 12 years before Curie could isolate the radium that was inside the pitchblende, which would have proved if her findings had truly existed.  

Pitchblende (By Geomartin – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6612845)

After all of Curie and her husband’s discoveries and findings, they would eventually share the Nobel Prize alongside another scientist, making her the first woman to ever be awarded the Nobel Prize. Unfortunately, after many years working with radioactivity, she later died from aplastic anemia at age 66 in 1934. This is a rare but serious blood condition that occurs when your bone marrow cannot make enough new blood cells for your body to work normally.  

Curie’s scientific discoveries have had a great impact on our society by informing us about radioactivity and its importance in our society, and her works will always be valued and celebrated. 

 

 

 

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